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with specific goals and general education and our diverse learners that benefit as you can understand from teachers with a repertoire of strategies. in gathering this general data we have contracted with pearson's review 360 and a screening tool that makes it easier to input aggregate behavioral student trends. i want to emphasize for the community that this universal screening is not a test or evaluation of students or pupils, but rather it's a teacher survey to collect teacher's observations of people's behavior. all of the information that is collected has been directly observed by families doing their daily responsibilities to manage student behavior. the survey doesn't require teachers to do psychological testing or any mental health assessments as stated in the letter. please note above that the universal screening data would be used to determine if there are enhancements needed to support students in school or what supplemental or methods are necessary. i also want to call everyone's attention this is mendoza and we have joining our president and celebrating january as nationa
, breed, chiu, farrell, kim, mar and wiener. higher education truly is the key to success in this country and the ability of many students to attend an institution of of higher learning is based largely on their ability to secure financial assistance. i know from my own personal experience i'll not be here today sitting in this chair without the ability to have received financial assistance to go to college and to go to law school. unfortunately, the cost of the higher education continues to rise for private, public and for profit community colleges thought this country and students and families in san francisco are right now in the ross pros of making very important decisions about their future. so it is critical that we as a city increase the awareness about financial aid and how the process worgz and specifically the free application for federal student aid, the f a f s a application, which if completed will ensure that student have access to the many reresource available to them and it helps student but it helps us all because it ensures that they get the education that they need fo
the city was going to appropriate the full amount of the public education enrichment fund that in the district materials that would be transmitted to the city, the mayor and the board of supervisors and the other city officials, that we would specify that -- we would make some sort of a statement that we would -- we expect full funding or appropriation from the city for 13-14 -- i actually haven't shared with this chris and kathy and part of that why is so because in the mayor's state of the city address yesterday he remarked about his intention to fully fund the public education enrichment fund and specified the amounts of funding that would be associated with the appropriation for 13-14 and i confirmed with the mayor's budget director one-on-one just to make sure we were crystal clear about the intention. that that was the right interpretation and she confirmed it was so and we could share that information with our board members and stakeholders which is why you all received the email that you did this morning from dr. crawford, so based on that commissioner wynns i see
and environment? >> it is critical. it is critical to have minds that have been educated, interdisciplinary people coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has conduct encourage it with research. some of the larger companies that research labs in mission bay as well. bayer and others. they are even innovating about their laboratories, because it is so expensive to build your own laboratory. so they are trying to bring some of these pharmaceutical answers to the market faster. they have an incredible spirit of innovation in those laboratories. and they are inviting other companies, not jus
a member of the bcc as well. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's our [inaudible] to you with the education on board. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's providing report to the board members. >> [speaking spanish] >> and generally we're going to decide what we're going to focus on in 2012-2013. >> [speaking spanish] >> observations that we're going to include in that report if we can are our observations regarding enrollment. >> [speaking spanish] >> thank you. >> well, superintendent carranza and board of education commissioners as you can see in our report we have a lot to celebrate and a lot of successes we have made. i am very happy to say great progress in how we are providing services for el students and families, so i think there's a lot to be -- a lot to appreciate and be thankful for. we do believe like we said in the beginning part of our report that we are working much more effectively together with san francisco unified leadership and are grateful for that and my portion of the report are the concerns that we condition to -- continue to have in the bcc and in reviewing the letter
to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say someth
well. >> i expect her to recover and continue with our education and hopefully go on to university. >> that education is the point, the cost for which he suffered, and to which she is now devoted. >> when you educate a girl, you educate the whole family. you educate a generation. you educate all the other coming children. >> in launching the malala fund, she shows a determination to turn this terrible experience into something positive. quite courage and resolution have turned a 15-year-old schoolgirl into a powerful, global symbol of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghan
sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young pe
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
. he released his annual letter describes the work he plan to do in global health and education. i speak with him on the road ahead for the company he founded and the company's successor. >> tech leaders, those are tough jobs. and steve has done a good job. >> microsoft, would you ever return to the ceo office? >> i'm engaged but my full time work will be the foundation work. microsoft is a competitive field, surface computer is doing well, so, you know i'll i share lots of ideas about where it should go and the field as a whole should be proud of how quickly it's moving and microsoft will lead in those areas. >> you and melinda have given away some billions how do you see your work now? >> we are committed to the diseases that affect the poorest. all of the childhood conditions. and until we treat the health of that poor child as being as important as the health of a rich child, that gives us decade after decade of needing to make progress. mali malaria is a great story. we are funding drug companies and new concepts that will when we get them, will eventually give us enough to ta
her school. public crew said began. >> i have the right of education. i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to speak. >> reporter: her actions made her a target. last october, she was brutally attacked. gunmen entered her van and shot her at point blank range in the head. she was medevaced to england in critical condition, but she refused to die. the bullet glanced off her skull, traveled cown her check and into her shoulder. incredibly, it didn't enter her brain. as her story spread, so did her following. i spoke with her father, a schoolteacher himself. malala has become a hero. she has now triggered a huge movement around the world. she gets letters from children. >> malala is incredible. >> reporter: they have made videos for her. have you ever imagined it would be this kind of reaction to what happened to her? >> i think malala is an inspiration for the children all over the world. when she fell, pakistan stood and the whole world supported her. >> reporter: today, malala was sitting up in bed after five hours of surgery thi
out and educating businesses right now. the likelihood you'll by looking at the bigger side of our business >> director i believe if more than your business is one second for it will be taxed at a different rate and i make everything i sell. so i'm making it and selling it. right but you're also whole sailing >> yeah, but wholesale and retail are in the same bracket. by definition the - so i look like a retailer but i'm a manufacturer if you proportion the dollars >> well, is your margin bigger than air manufacturing costs it will be interesting to find out how they find this. >> look by definition your whole sailing it and selling it. >> not every manufacture will have a manufacturer presence. >> yeah, so this is - anyway pointing out. >> again we're not going out and promoting this yet base we're still talking about this and there will be an awe apportionment but they'll be some guidelines on. >> i have a question. saying there is a small business exemption for gross receipts less than one million but on the second page it shows the gross rates is from zero to one million
to tick now. this is going to be a yearlong educational project. we have the tables set up at flavors if we can get a table but it can start answering some of the questions. >> and perhaps we'll be meeting sometime next week but we could look at this as a potential workshop. >> thank you. >> mr. president, can we call public comment on the gross receipts tax? seeing none public comment is closed. >> update and the small business center and making comments on small business activities. >> so commissioners this morning mayor lee gave his city address and this is the first address as he being mayor. while there were numerous items when he went through all the things awe employment over the last year but business-related he talked about the gross receipts and passage and the collective work on creating that piece of legislation and the unanimous sport around that. no need the growth of manufacturing the increasing of funding for lending programs that the city is doing and soon by the end of this month through mid february i think we may be getting the announcement about the mid loan
-- education and western thinking. she even made the short list for "time" magazine's person of the year. >>> students are putting their talents to good use. our education reporter sherrie johnson shows how they're making a difference. >> reporter: members of the laser club are hard at work. these students make anything from cabinets to chairs. the list just got a little larger thanks to city school administrators. they bought a state of the art laser machine for students. they said it raise great to see a what city students can do. >> we want them to be prepared for the future, their job. they will learn everything they need to learn on the job. they need to be able to show their employability skills. >> reporter: carve ver's laser skill has a partnership with habitat for humanity, private and public schools. they fill orders. the money for the supplies are donated and students love the experience. >> hands-on things. i love fixing stuff. it helps me. i like this. >> reporter: students showed off their handy work by presenting a plaque showcasing positive programs in baltimore schools.
'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i personally adopted the 12 middle schools in this city to make sure that the truancy goes down, is not eliminated, that the kids who are in our middle schools have the hope, the hope that we're generating when they were in elementary school, involved with their parents, have the same kind of guidance and support as they get to critical decisionses about whether or not they see the vision of living in the city and going to college and getting the kind of education and skill sets to take on these great jobs that we're creating. i want to make sure -- yes. (applause) >> i want to make sure that our tech sf are training programs rhonda is heading up and so many others create the foundation at the skill sets to earn these new jobs. it's ecology jobs that we all see happening that pay very good salaries, that we're training people in bayview, in the western addition, in all of our city to make sure they have not only the good shots that they get those jobs as well. and that's why it's so important that all the companies in
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
that education and training cannot overcome intense market incentives. a vocal, point for payment reform has been mentioned. aha a committee is a secretive group of doctors that wields tremendous influence over medicare reimbursement rates. the cms and adopts nearly all of their recommendations. at a minimum, the public deserves transparency. but yet, we should establish rates of thing that is not favoring narrow specialties. the federal government and ama are colluding to bring an end to the primary care physician work force in the united states. in summary, it is clear that health insurance provides better health outcomes, including a decrease risk for death. despite this, we will leave 30 million uninsured. i have worked for over a decade in medical education as a student, resident, fellow, and a faculty member and program later. it is my conviction that public responsive training should meet the health care needs of our population, and rather than the staffing needs of hospitals or the lifestyle preferences of young doctors. >> my understanding is that senator franken has to leave, and you wa
the money on the 25-year term demanded by his education secretary? will he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? perhaps he might say -- optamus schola nova, we need a new school? >> i'll leave the latin to the mayor of london but would have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is it you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what the previous labor government did in their early terms. the money is there. in terms of the banks, the funding lending scheme from the bank of england, evidence shows it is having an effect on lowering interest rates and reforming p.f.i. but also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury never has done before to help projects go ahead. >> damian hinds? >> nothing is more important in the early years education than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree raising the bar and elevating their status will help the prestige to the profession and help parents give children the best start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is absolutely light and
the work his foundation is doing to address challenges in global health and education across the globe. i spoke to the man who made microsoft at the world economic forum in davos last week. in the road aweighedhead for the company he founded and his success successor, steve bammer. >> tech leaders, those are hard jobs. amazing things. be great. >> microsoft has not had an easy time recently. would you ever return to the front office? >> i'm engaged adds chairman on a part-time basis but my full-time work for the rest of my life will be the foundation work. microsoft has a lot of exciting things going on. it's a competitive field. windows 8 has done well. surface computers are doing well. so i share lots of ideas about where office should go and, you know, i think the field as a whole should be proud of how quickly it's moving and microsoft is lead in a lot of those areas. >> you and melinda have given away some $28 billion through your found dags. your fortune is still more than $68 billion. where do you see your work now? >> well, we're committed to the diseases that affect the poorest,
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear jim say when you look at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics an
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
bonuses simply refuse to lend the money on the 25 year term demanded by his education secretary? would he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? [laughter] we need our new school. >> i will leave the latin to the mayor of london if that's all right but also to have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is if you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what was previously labour government did in his earlier to pick the money is there. entrance of the banks, the funding for lenny seen from the bank of england, i think it is having an effect at lowering interest rates. we are reforming but we're also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury has never done before, to help projects go ahead. >> thank you nothing is more important than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree that raising the bar, elevating their space will help us teach the profession to poor parenting to children the best possible start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is right and i would pay tribute
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
month-- she insisted she will go on advocating for the education of girls. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of people. because all the people, men, women, children, all of them, all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers, god has given me a second life. this is a new life. i want to serve the people. i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> sreenivasan: the teenager is expected to remain in britain for some time. newly installed secretary of state john kerry had his first day on the job today. the former senator entered the state department's harry truman building to a big crowd and loud cheers from staffers. he said he hopes to help make the world more prosperous and peaceful. wall street had its worst day of the year to date, amid new concerns about europe and its debt load. the dow jones industrial average fell back under 14,000 losing 129 points to close at 13,880. the nasdaq dropped nearly 48 points to close at 3131. baltimore ravens fans celebrated their super bowl win today. it was the second time the team has won the nfl championship.
plate said that she was recovering well. >> i expect her to recover and continue with our education and hopefully go on to university. >> that education is the point, the cost for which he suffered, and to which she is now devoted. >> when you educate a girl, you educate the whole family. you educate a generation. you educate all the other coming children. >> in launching the malala fund, she shows a determination to turn this terrible experience into something positive. quite courage and resolution have turned a 15-year-old schoolgirl into a powerful, global symbol of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives the prime minister inv
in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. >> pelley: without raising rates again? >> without raising rates again. >> pelley: the president also made news with his opinion on the boy scouts. the national board of the boy scouts of america may decide this week whether to end its long-standing ban on gays in scouting. should scouting be open to gays? >> yes. >> pelley: why so? >> well because i think that my attitude is that gays and lesbians should have access and opportunity the same way everybody else does. in every institution and walk of life. and, you know, the scouts are a great institution that are promoting young people and exposing them to opportunities and leadership that will serve people for the rest of their lives. i think nobody should be barred for that. >> pelley: the scouts decide by wednesday. one of the oldest missing persons cases in history has been solved. how did a murderer with a history of mental illness get permits to buy guns? and the girl who was shot for defying the taliban speaks out when the "cbs evening news" conti
. >> ama: we have you covered. ahead, remembering a woman who made education history in san francisco. >> dan: a break in the case as police investigate oakland's latest murder. what happened during a street -- >> what it took to get oral kell team u.s.a. sailing this yacht again. >> leigh: what a terrific day it was today. enjoy tomorrow, because rain is returning. we'll take a look at the >> dan: new dew details in a shooting that left one person and three injured at a street fair in oakland on friday night. police have arrested the spurted gunman but are not releasing any information until charges are filed. organizers of the event that showcase local artists are meeting with city leaders to discuss security at the event. more than so thousand people attended. >> ama: a woman who broke two barriers in education in san francisco as died. arena akerman was the first woman and first african-american to serve as san francisco school superintendent. she improved student performance but was forced to resign in 2005 amid charges she didn't get along will with parents and teachers. she die
system or education. it will be more protests against the way politics are run in spain. it is a new situation. it has never happened before. it could really lead to changes or not. there is no precedent. >> a schoolgirl and pakistan is being treated after being shot by the taliban and has undergone another to successful operations. she was shot in the head in october as she left school. she was targeted because she campaigned for girls' education. on saturday, doctors reconstructed her skull and fitted in plant into her ear. doctors say they are pleased with her progress. there currently at the country residence of the bridge by mr. following talks on monday trade is the third trilateral summit since last year. the leaders met in july and into the timber. but for the first time, terry and intelligence officials will join them for face-to-face talks as part of an effort to improve cooperation and forestry to withdraw from afghanistan next year. a fire has destroyed almost 100 homes in a shantytown in the capital of bangladesh. everyone appears to have escaped, but it has left more th
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
of the public education reason rich ment fund community advisory community. superintendent. all right. it's not time for general public comment now. >> [inaudible] >> sir, sir. >> [inaudible] there was a vice principal that touched a child inappropriately -- [inaudible] >> sir --sir, i don't want to clear the room. you're out of order. >> yeah -- let's. >> this is inappropriate. you need to sit down sir. >> sir. >> you need to sit down sir. >> my name is charles e smith pastor. >> all right. i am clearing the room. please leave the >> good fortune of spending at least one night a month with the members to work on looking at it and how it's serving our students and help to make it a more impactful initiative so each year we take time to recognize each member of the peace cap and first we want to start with folks terming down after four years of services and i wanted to remind commissioners that we do have some vacancy and i will send you information so we can fill the seats and keep our positive momentum going. i'm want sure if all these folks are here but wanted to recognize them but
they did an incredible job of educating voters about scott brown's ties to big oil. that was essential in my victory. when carl row started pouring money into new mexico to defeat me, they pushed back to help sure we won this race. so pretty powerful endorsements from races where we worked. let me close with a few forward looking comments on the second obama term. sp despite these electoral victories, we believe congress is a dysfunctional place to do business and we think advancements in congress on environmental policies are slim. that means the main opportunity for forward progress in the next few years with the president authority through executive action he can take. we anticipate that we'll continue to see pretty broad and sweeping attacks on our air, our water, our land, our wild life from the boehner led house of representatives and in the senate we anticipate our senate allies will stand strong against these misled attacks. as i said, this election cycle demonstrated there is strong support for addressing climate change. this is heightened in the wake of super storm sandy and
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
. the average american, who had grade school education in 1940, now had completed high school. americans were making more money and working fewer hours. they enjoyed the good life. for most people, the benefits of economic growth were there for the taking. but by the end of the 1960s, hidden costs appeared. automobiles dumped 230,000 tons of carbon monoxide a day into the air. los angeles air was hazardous most of the year. oil spills in the santa barbara channel fouled miles of beaches. pesticide spraying was threatening many species of birds. pesticide spills killed some 15 million fish in arkansas. three million acres of hillsides lay stripped bare for their coal. and in cleveland, the local industrial sewer, the cuyahoga river, caught fire. environmentalists had found a loophole in the gnp. the gnp measures goods and services traded, for example, scrubbers used to clean sulfur emissions. clean air isn't bought or sold, so it's not counted. if sulfur is not cleaned up, the resulting pollution is not subtracted. gnp is not reduced. gnp fails to take into account environmental values. if we
is implemented. the other thing is education. educate the young players at an early age. invest in a 10-year time, but it may be too late. it has already targetted things like the no. 17 world cup. if they pitch up and buy in at munich, they cannot say they are done because his name will be in the papers. it's an insidious problem that will demand a concerted effort. >> and this is just the beginning of the story, i'm sure. thanks so much, titus. >> of low and behold, more corruption. the spanish prime minister facing questions over corruption allegations and has won praise from german chancellor angela merkel for his handling of the economic crisis. he has imposed a harsh austerity measures and lowered borrowing costs, but the spanish economy is continuing to contract. >> the german chancellor warmly welcome the spanish premier, a change of pace for the prime minister facing the problems at home. he traveled to berlin wristbands that the. ever deeper into-- he traveled to berlin with spain even deeper into the concession. >> i reiterated once again that we're full of respect for the reforms impl
nonprofit organization that is helping latino youth get ready for higher education. today i'm saluting edu-futuro. >> they actually reach out to the latino community. it's very difficult to understand how the college application is like. >> marisela lara is a junior in high school. she is the first in her family preparing to go to college. edu-futuro is helping her go through the process. >> they have unique needs and barriers, language, culture. >> lara wants to study medicine and edu-futuro is giving her advice. layer a is in -- when ara is in the emerging leaders -- lara is in the emerging leaders program, someone who can offer her help on the sats and offer emotional help. >> i'm taking on bigger roles. i started my own club at school. >> reporter: it was started by -- [indiscernible] -- back in 1998. its mission is to mentor latino students of all backgrounds. >> i envision our community to be engaged, compassionate, educated community members because i really believe in the united states. i'm an immigrant myself. >> reporter: lara says she is not only being proactive about her future
's for education office has convened a group of constituents across the city, across public nonpublic community based organizations to come together to then develop the strategies that can help those kids get over the hurdles they are facing to be connected. >> and i guess we should point this out, mayor gray is the one who put this coalition together. let me ask you a question critics would say. data gathering alone like this really be enough to make a difference. what has to happen next. >> of course data gathering is not enough. what happens next is this data goes out to the people on the ground doing the work. the deputy mayor for education has convened not only the executive council leadership team but also then convened the change networks, the people working on the ground, running the programs and delivering the services to be able to think critically about the programs they run and best deliver services to the young people in need. >> here's one last question, another finding showed that young people between 20 and 24 early 20s and in that group in dc only 42% have full-time jobs and th
will take away your $5 million salary and give you a free education how would you feel about that? john: the alabama coach? >> we live in a society we have labor rights for people can negotiate salaries. it doesn't make sense they make millions of dollars nobody turns on the college basketball game to see the coach they look for the players. icahn the parents share in the revenue? john: there's not much of a movement they don't complain >> the complaint. if they speak freely on the issue the ones understand how much money is made are very resentful. remember the fab five from the university of michigan's chris webber talks about seeing his jersey on sale for $100 if he cannot afford to go to mcdonald's. nobody gives that many to be next. the quickest way to get a fair result is for players to get to the final four and say we don't go on the court and tell the family gets many. then they don't get paid and i guarantee they would come to the negotiating table quick. john: i agree with you. but most americans do not agree with us. >> no. >> no. >> no. >> no. absolutely not. >> they go to s
challenging background, single mother, raised by a single mother. had no education. and really, no hope. and what i always say, i was lucky that i was put in front of an icon of empowerment. >> he is. every time i interview him, i feel empowered. >> that's true. what he is is an incredible educator. by the grace of the universe i was able to fall in the lap of this educator. he helped get me out of that place where i was, where there was no hope. >> he was homeless at the time. what i love about mike's story, is mike just didn't help himself. he built a small business to start with. one of the young women who worked for him was addicted to meth. is that right? share the story and how you ended up in your new business. >> the young woman had come to work for me a number of years ago. you could tell something was wrong. she was addicted to methamphetamine. she was a daily user of ecstacy. i got her involved in mr. robbins' program. within 30 days, she was completely off drugs. it turned out her father, her dad was incredibly successful in the metal recycling business. i got a call from hi
is actually through the pme, through the nco academy, through the officer sessions, education and training is teach men and women how to manage, um, some of the challenges that are going to come up related to gender, related to dating, related to rumors, related to concerns about if i push a woman, am i going to be accused of singling her out and harassing her, or am i then developing her and her skills? we can share the lessons that we've learned to make them more effective at it rather than leave each sort of man and woman to invent it themselves or figure it out themselves or learn through trial and error which we can potentially, um, lose out or wash out in other women. >> good. thank you, dr. miller. very insightful. i think we've heard a good discussion up to this point about the possibility of gender-neutral physical standards and how they would be implemented and enforced. the necessary role of leadership, continuing to build on changing the culture. i'd like to allow the, or give the audience an opportunity now to ask some questions. gayle, would you like to ask the first one? >>
stricter gun laws. >> as far as educators who care about the safety and well-being of young people, we needed to stand up. >> reporter: the all right calls for keeping guns off college campuses as well as universal background checks and a new assault weapons ban. >> president obama is also pushing for easier access to mental healthcare and more cops on the beat to help address gun violence. >>> the new secretary of state john kerry got down to business today. staffers held a welcoming ceremony for the former massachusetts senator this morning at the state department. on his first day on the job kerry told them president obama needs their help to make america safer and the world more prosperous and peaceful. he also said he has big heels to fill referring to his two predecessors, hillary clinton and condoleezza rice. >>> three high schoolboys charged with child pornography were back in class today at west springfield high school and some students and parents are not happy about that. peggy fox joins us live from west springfield high. i understand this was a story that's difficult for
this imbalance, congress created the children's hospital graduate medical education program. this is a program that was created and has been sustained with bipartisan support. unfortunately the program is facing elimination. president obama's budget for the 2012 fiscal year called for elimination of the program, despite the positive results. i support getting rid of programs that are duplicative, unproven or unnecessary. especially with the budget pressures we're facing now. however chgme has a proven track record. over 40% of pediatricians in the united states are trained through chgme. 43% of those in subspecialties are trained through the program. the children's hospital of philadelphia runs the largest pediatric residency in the country. the residents will treat children in my community and then move across the country to practice in other communities. we need their expertise now more than ever. last congress i worked with commy democratic counterpart on the -- my democrat counterpart to renew the program. our legislation passed the house of representatives twice in the 112th congress, bot
-time work since. college-educated, 20 years of experience. i live in san francisco in an area where did score -- where discrimination based on age is encouraged. discrimination based on race is encouraged as well. it is a shame. my senators, basically if you are not from a protected class, you do not exist. these people -- i saved up a lot of money over my life and had planned on retiring at 65, like everyone else, but i spent a lot of my retirement just trying to survive, which is a shame. host: was your retirement 401k? personal savings? how did it break down? caller: it was a mix. host:-, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. -- ash, n.c., joe is joining us on the independent line. caller: all of a sudden everything fell apart several years ago. i could have retired, but i saw the writing on the wall, businesses started falling down and everyone who has a retirement, god bless you, but it is so hard. i feel bad for the grandchildren who they all say are not going to make it. it is terrible, this country has put a hole in front of everything else. they have got to quit doin
with great education and great skills know their job security is fragile. as a way to protect yourself, people like to think that that could never happen to me. i am good enough that i would not lose my job or if i did, i would certainly be able to find something away. in some ways by turning on the unemployed and putting it on them, in some ways, there is a bizarre defense mechanism that makes people feel more secure about their own jobs in a fragile economy. i think there is a lot of complex factors going on here. it is certainly eroded very deeply in a complete misunderstanding of just how bad the economy and the recovery has been. host: what is the best way to protect these people? guest: is important for them to be honest and talk about why you lost your job and talk in detail -- if it was because the company went under or there were massive layoffs or the industry were working in started suffering -- talk in detail about all you have done to try to get re-employed. employers don't wish -- don't want to hire lazy people. people are out there actively looking. discuss the creative
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